Craig Pittman, Environment, Growth and Development Reporter

Craig Pittman

Environment, Growth and Development Reporter

I’m a native Floridian whose family arrived here in 1850. I graduated from Troy State University in Alabama, where my muckraking for the student paper prompted an agitated dean to label me “the most destructive force on campus.” Since then I’ve covered a variety of beats and quite a few natural disasters, including hurricanes, wildfires and the Florida Legislature. Stories I have written on environmental issues have won national awards, and "The Daily Show" once called me a "nerd" about Florida history. I’ve written four books. The most recent one,Oh, Florida! How America's Weirdest State Influences the Rest of the Country, is a New York Times bestseller and won a Florida Book Awards gold medal in 2017.

Strong hurricanes can produce “stormquakes” offshore, new study finds

This satellite image shows Hurricane Michael on Oct. 9, 2018, as it enters the Gulf of Mexico. It made landfall near Mexico Beach in the Panhandle as a Category 5 storm. Florida State University professor Wenyuan Fan said the storm probably created
Analysis of a decade of records shows hurricanes causing seismic activity on continental shelf

Vehicle emissions are up sharply, and it’s fueling climate change

Emissions from cars and trucks are a major source of the greenhouse gases fueling climate change. An analysis by the New York Times found that air pollution from those sources has increased in the Tampa Bay area by 55 percent since 1990. [Times (2008)]
Florida once had emissions inspections, but Jeb Bush ended them in 2000

Scientists map Florida panther genome

In 1995, Florida imported eight female Texas cougars and released them into the wild to breed with male panthers. Five successfully produced kittens that were free of the genetic defects that had been plaguing the purebred panthers. This 1995 photo depicts the release of one of the female Texas cougars. [Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission] . Photo by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Next they hope to use it to see how breeding panthers with Texas cougars affected the panthers’ DNA

State’s new bear management plan does not call for another bear hunt

Richard Sajko of Valrico, FL talks about how he killed one of the two bears on the back of his pickup truck at the first Florida Black Bear hunt in 21 years at the Rock Springs Run Wildlife Management Area near Lake Mary Florida. 
(Saturday, October 24, 2015.) [LUIS SANTANA | Times]
The 2015 hunt, the first in 21 years, caused so much controversy that wildlife officials put off deciding about another one until now

Ending invasive species group ‘a disaster,’ says Florida scientist who helped start it

University of Florida researchers hold a 15-foot Burmese python captured in Everglades National Park in 2009. The python had just eaten a 6-foot alligator. Florida has more invasive species than any other state.
Citing cost, the Trump Administration shuts down 20-year-old advisory committee.